Login   
C6owners :: Forums :: C6 Support :: The Garage

DPF query

Home   Forum Rules    Forum Help  Conversion Tools
   
Please Register to enjoy additional Member Benefits
Top Thanked Forum Posts: Today | Week | Month | Year | All time | Most Thanks Given: To member | By user
Author Post
CitroenCrazy   
Tue Jan 08 2019, 09:05pm
Joined: Apr 17 2011
Member No: #443
Location: UK
Hi All
For the past few hundred miles, my 2.2 C6 has been flashing up a warning "risk of particle filter clogging", together with the amber SERVICE light.
The car's only done 53,000 miles.

I finally got round to using the Diagbox on it, and found the force regeneration feature. I ran the on-the-move version, which completed sucesfully after about 10 minutes. I convinced myself something was happening, as at one point I thought I could smell something hot, but that may have been wishful thinking.

Anyway, on restarting, the same mesasage came up.
So, the following day I repeated the exercise. Again, it finished the sequence after about 10 minutes.

At the end of the regeneration, there's a Diagbox message that says "under parameter measurements, check the soot load is equal to 0%". Well the first time, I couldn't find where to do this, but the second time I was more tenacious. I found where the parameter can be read and it said 4%, so not 0%, but 4% doesn't sound too bad, does it ?

The same screen shows the amount of Eolys left, which the car thinks is 2421 ml

The same particulate filter message is still coming up.

My commute is 40 minutes, mostly on the motorway, and mostly restricted to 50mph (upgrading to smart motorway....) so not thrashing it, but at least it gets the engine warmed through.

Anyone any thoughts ?
Thanks
MGmike   
Tue Jan 08 2019, 10:34pm
Joined: May 21 2017
Member No: #3151
Location: South Queensferry
Yes, blast it for a couple of hours up the M1 or 6 when you take the boss out for a romantic weekend away. It'll do wonders for the car, him/her and you might get a bonus!!!!

Use it or lose it

Ciaran2   
Tue Jan 08 2019, 10:46pm
Joined: Dec 30 2018
Member No: #3789
Location: .
The DPF, will gradually fill up, even when going through regular regenerations (which it will be with your daily 40 mile motorway commutes).

When it reaches a particular point of 'fullness' (sensed by comparing the pressure differential between the sensors at the entry and exit points), the display will regularly report 'Risk of particle filter clogging', particularly if you accelerate or push the car hard.

You can mitigate this for a time by switching to a fuel with an integrated cleansing agent (such as BP Ultimate or Shell V-Power), this may yield some improvement or the problem may go away entirely. It can take a month to 6 weeks for the effects to be felt. 53,000 miles seems quite low for these symptoms but much of it depends on the cars usage, the type of fuel its been primarily run on, kind of journeys etc.

If not, the other course of action is to attempt to clear out, or replace the DPF, the latter obviously being a headache you want to avoid if at all possible.

Some people have reported great results with simply removing the DPF and attacking it with a powerwasher, blasting the embedded soot particles out (whilst obviously being careful not to be *too* rough and risking damaging the delicate honeycomb inside.
Others have soaked it in chemicals overnight (be careful about this as some substances could damage the coating of the special metals inside), before hosing out.

Some companies offer DPF cleaning services which involve spraying aerosols or chemicals down the inlet, which results in foam discharge out the exhaust and reams of smoke. Whether this achieves any meaningful cleaning of the DPF in real terms is a matter of intense debate, but some people have reported positive results.

Personally, I don't think there's any substitute for getting it off the car and cleaned out with pressure, but one of these products may well sort out your issue.

I can't remember exactly where, but somewhere in the Lexia / PP2000 menus where you can instigate regeneration, there's a reading which shows how full the computer believes the DPF is and how likely a forced regenration is to have a positive effect on the problem. I believe when I started getting the 'Risk of particle filter clogging' warnings, mine was sitting at 60-70% full and the possibility of regeneration helping was described as 'Not favourable' in the menu. Hopefully yours isn't that bad, at 53,000 miles I'd like to think it isn't.

If you have a search for 'DIY DPF cleaning', you'll find a lot of information, including some useful Youtube videos.

Ciaran
5 User said Thank You to Ciaran2 for this Post :
 cruiserphil (09 January 2019) , Tjensen (09 January 2019) , CitroenCrazy (09 January 2019) , FraserG (09 January 2019) , Archielea (17 January 2019)
MGmike   
Tue Jan 08 2019, 11:17pm
Joined: May 21 2017
Member No: #3151
Location: South Queensferry
Ciaran2 wrote ...

The DPF, will gradually fill up, even when going through regular regenerations (which it will be with your daily 40 mile motorway commutes).

When it reaches a particular point of 'fullness' (sensed by comparing the pressure differential between the sensors at the entry and exit points), the display will regularly report 'Risk of particle filter clogging', particularly if you accelerate or push the car hard.

You can mitigate this for a time by switching to a fuel with an integrated cleansing agent (such as BP Ultimate or Shell V-Power), this may yield some improvement or the problem may go away entirely. It can take a month to 6 weeks for the effects to be felt. 53,000 miles seems quite low for these symptoms but much of it depends on the cars usage, the type of fuel its been primarily run on, kind of journeys etc.

If not, the other course of action is to attempt to clear out, or replace the DPF, the latter obviously being a headache you want to avoid if at all possible.

Some people have reported great results with simply removing the DPF and attacking it with a powerwasher, blasting the embedded soot particles out (whilst obviously being careful not to be *too* rough and risking damaging the delicate honeycomb inside.
Others have soaked it in chemicals overnight (be careful about this as some substances could damage the coating of the special metals inside), before hosing out.

Some companies offer DPF cleaning services which involve spraying aerosols or chemicals down the inlet, which results in foam discharge out the exhaust and reams of smoke. Whether this achieves any meaningful cleaning of the DPF in real terms is a matter of intense debate, but some people have reported positive results.

Personally, I don't think there's any substitute for getting it off the car and cleaned out with pressure, but one of these products may well sort out your issue.

I can't remember exactly where, but somewhere in the Lexia / PP2000 menus where you can instigate regeneration, there's a reading which shows how full the computer believes the DPF is and how likely a forced regenration is to have a positive effect on the problem. I believe when I started getting the 'Risk of particle filter clogging' warnings, mine was sitting at 60-70% full and the possibility of regeneration helping was described as 'Not favourable' in the menu. Hopefully yours isn't that bad, at 53,000 miles I'd like to think it isn't.

If you have a search for 'DIY DPF cleaning', you'll find a lot of information, including some useful Youtube videos.

Ciaran

an excellent synopsise. I much prefer the blast it up the m'way for an hour or two remedy. I mean, when is a 6 at its best?
travlician   
Wed Jan 09 2019, 09:24pm
Joined: Jan 22 2011
Member No: #350
Location: Paradera
There are other reasons for the message, like when regeneration can not take place because of other issues like EGR or turbo related problems. Also, I had the message when the differential pressure sensor damaged. So check for other messages in Lexia and solve them first.
2 User said Thank You to travlician for this Post :
 FraserG (09 January 2019) , cruiserphil (10 January 2019)
Dan595   
Tue Jan 15 2019, 09:45am
Joined: Nov 26 2010
Member No: #299
Location: Wiltshire
Worth knowing (if you don't already) that the car needs (I think) 20 litres of fuel in the tank to allow regeneration.

I had this 'risk of clogging' message on my 2.2 at c. 200,000 miles. Cleared the fault log and have not seen it again.
1 User said Thank You to Dan595 for this Post :
 cruiserphil (15 January 2019)
 

Jump:     Back to top

User Colour Key:
Head Administrator, Administrator, C6 owner, Technical Expert, C6 Premier Discount Club