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@ 93K miles - is now a good time to get a timing belt change?

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321dave   
Sun Feb 21 2016, 07:31pm
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
321dave wrote ...

Trainman wrote ...

I've started a new thread for the picture issues rather than tie up this thread - Click Here -


Many thanks Steve


I think all is good again. Right where were we regarding the timing belt locking set. This picture of the small set comes it seems with the crankshaft locking pin and a single cam lock pin, but I think it should have two pins?


cruiserphil   
Sun Feb 21 2016, 08:41pm

Joined: Jan 24 2010
Member No: #38
Location: Celbridge
Hello 321Dave,

The kit you show is the supplement kit you need to buy in addition to the main laser kit to use on the 2.7. Have a look at the description - Click Here -. The picture shows the flywheel locking tool and, I think, the coolant pump locking tool.

For this reason I went for the Sealey kit which has all you need in one kit - Click Here -.

Hope this helps!

Best regards,

Phil C.
1 User said Thank You to cruiserphil for this Post :
 321dave (23 February 2016)
e3steve   
Sun Feb 21 2016, 09:29pm
Joined: Jan 21 2013
Member No: #1163
Location: Warsash, Hants & Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Dave, that pin looks too short to hold the cam pulleys. Besides, if you have only one cam pulley locking pin, just use a couple of M6 x 80 coach bolts or similar. Cracking-off all the screws before removing the old belt worked for me, so actually 'locking' the pulleys wasn't necessary; the pins merely 'hold' the pulleys in place when the belt is removed and in order to not upset the timing.

You don't need to lock the crankshaft -- it stays put. I just centre-popped it and the engine block to ensure that it hadn't moved when I fitted the new belt.

Follow the Sealey PDF instruction document -- the one that I sent to you -- to the letter.

Oh, and make sure you get the water pump timing correct...
321dave   
Sun Feb 21 2016, 10:23pm
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
e3steve wrote ...

Dave, that pin looks too short to hold the cam pulleys. Besides, if you have only one cam pulley locking pin, just use a couple of M6 x 80 coach bolts or similar. Cracking-off all the screws before removing the old belt worked for me, so actually 'locking' the pulleys wasn't necessary; the pins merely 'hold' the pulleys in place when the belt is removed and in order to not upset the timing.

You don't need to lock the crankshaft -- it stays put. I just centre-popped it and the engine block to ensure that it hadn't moved when I fitted the new belt.

Follow the Sealey PDF instruction document -- the one that I sent to you -- to the letter.

Oh, and make sure you get the water pump timing correct...


Thanks Steve, when you say water pump timing, are you referring to the aux belt pulley and getting that setup properly after the new pump is fitted. When you had wound on the new belt did you turn the engine over using a large breaker bar or something similar to check the belt was turning well on the pulley assembly before closing up the covers? And do you turn it clockwise if so?

I was looking around and reading up a bit on the torque values, do you know the torque valve of the crankshaft pulley, and does that pulley have a heavily torqued centre bolt? sorry for asking I'm sure I just missed that info somewhere in the tech documents I have collected so far. Thanks again.

I think the full kit I purchased has the two pins anyway, amongst other bits. One handy tool apparently is the metal clip that looks very like an old pair of bike clips! They help hold the new belt on the crankshaft pulley while the rest is put around the various quide pulleys and finally around the tensioner.







321dave   
Tue Feb 23 2016, 11:27am
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
cruiserphil wrote ...

Hello 321Dave,

The kit you show is the supplement kit you need to buy in addition to the main laser kit to use on the 2.7. Have a look at the description - Click Here -. The picture shows the flywheel locking tool and, I think, the coolant pump locking tool.

For this reason I went for the Sealey kit which has all you need in one kit - Click Here -.

Hope this helps!

Best regards,

Phil C.


Apologies Phil,
must of missed your reply. I'm checking that Sealey kit out now.
I have the Laser 4273 small kit somewhere at home as well as the bigger general kit.
321dave   
Tue Feb 23 2016, 11:53am
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
321dave wrote ...

cruiserphil wrote ...

Hello 321Dave,

The kit you show is the supplement kit you need to buy in addition to the main laser kit to use on the 2.7. Have a look at the description - Click Here -. The picture shows the flywheel locking tool and, I think, the coolant pump locking tool.

For this reason I went for the Sealey kit which has all you need in one kit - Click Here -.

Hope this helps!

Best regards,

Phil C.


Apologies Phil,
must of missed your reply. I'm checking that Sealey kit out now.
I have the Laser 4273 small kit somewhere at home as well as the bigger general kit.






I'm guessing the small black pin is to lock the water pump? And the longer chromed pins are for the two camshaft locking slots? Any ideas to the third slightly yellowed chromed pin and what it might be used for? or maybe its for a different engine.
The bicycle clip item I know is to hold the timing belt on to the crankshaft first until its put around the new pulleys and finishes at the tensioner. In fact, I think the black parts are for the 2.7 engine and the last remaining large cylindrical part is for the crankshaft lock as G mentioned previously, but needs a modification to be used successfully.

If anyone has any other observations, please jump in.
cruiserphil   
Tue Feb 23 2016, 03:23pm

Joined: Jan 24 2010
Member No: #38
Location: Celbridge
321Dave,

If you start from top right in your photo and going clockwise, the items are:

1&2: Camshaft Locking Pins Land Rover/Jaguar/Citroen/Peugeot
3: Camshaft Timing Checking Pin Land Rover/Jaguar
4: Coolant Pump Locking Pin Citroen/Peugeot
5: Timing Belt Retaining Clip Citroen/Peugeot
6: Flywheel Locking Tool (Manual) Land Rover/Jaguar
7: Flywheel Locking Tool Citroen/Peugeot
8: Flywheel Locking Tool (Auto) Land Rover/Jaguar.

Hope this helps,

Phil C.
321dave   
Tue Feb 23 2016, 04:02pm
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
cruiserphil wrote ...

321Dave,

If you start from top right in your photo and going clockwise, the items are:

1&2: Camshaft Locking Pins Land Rover/Jaguar/Citroen/Peugeot
3: Camshaft Timing Checking Pin Land Rover/Jaguar
4: Coolant Pump Locking Pin Citroen/Peugeot
5: Timing Belt Retaining Clip Citroen/Peugeot
6: Flywheel Locking Tool (Manual) Land Rover/Jaguar
7: Flywheel Locking Tool Citroen/Peugeot
8: Flywheel Locking Tool (Auto) Land Rover/Jaguar.

Hope this helps,

Phil C.


Cheers Phil, thats great.
Best of luck with your timing belt as well. I'll stick up some photos of the condition of the old belt and pulleys on a near 130000 mile C6.
GZgidnick   
Wed Jan 08 2020, 11:59am
Joined: Jun 21 2019
Member No: #3950
Location: Melbourne
Reviving old post hoping someone is going to answer.

321dave mentioned above that the Flywheel locking tool (crankshaft) before it can be used needs to be modified.

This is true as I cannot fit the locking tool through the hole for the life of me.

I've tried cutting the tool to shorten it but I think is too [%*^#@!] thick.

Hoping that someone can share his experience or recommend a good locking tool for the crankshaft.

It a second week the car is in the garage because of this....


The tool number from Citroen is 0195-K 0915K
1 User said Thank You to GZgidnick for this Post :
 cruiserphil (09 January 2020)
David Hallworth   
Wed Jan 08 2020, 12:11pm

Joined: Apr 16 2010
Member No: #90
Location: Glasgow
I've been told that the hole in the block rusts and needs to be cleaned before the tool will fit. You could also rub the tool down a bit as well I guess.

I just bought one on eBay to do mine so am hoping it arrives quickly.

David.
321dave   
Thu Jan 09 2020, 02:53am
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
David Hallworth wrote ...

I've been told that the hole in the block rusts and needs to be cleaned before the tool will fit. You could also rub the tool down a bit as well I guess.

I just bought one on eBay to do mine so am hoping it arrives quickly.

David.



Hi GZ,
just reading the postings now. I followed e3steves advice in the end and didn't fit the flywheel lock at all as i had similar problems fitting mine, so I didn't lock it and just marked it with paint to check visually it really didn't move. It never did!!

So on I went then to the next bit after that.

If I was doing it again, I would not worry about that part (locking the crankshaft) to be honest. If your careful it's not a problem. Hope that helps a bit.

I could understand if it was a worry, but you will turn the crank when checking if the belt is on well when it is fitted and everything is torqued up.

You will notice it really needs a good bit of torque to turn it around. Really no issue of it moving easily. But my guess is they tell people to lock it in case you forget what you were doing and turned it by accident or someone else who was working on the engine with you turned it by accident I would say.

Best regrds
321dave
cruiserphil   
Thu Jan 09 2020, 10:22am

Joined: Jan 24 2010
Member No: #38
Location: Celbridge
This is true as I cannot fit the locking tool through the hole for the life of me.

I've tried cutting the tool to shorten it but I think is too [%*^#@!] thick.


Hello Marz,

I had the same problem. The wide tool body is too long and I found it also wouldn't enter the hole in the block after I ground off the excess length. I eventually got a friend to turn one on a lathe to a slightly reduced diameter. Just to note that I found releasing the left hand Y exhaust flexible connection allowed me to fit the tool easily by hand.

E3Steve and 321Dave confirm that it is unlikely the crankshaft will turn. Using an inspection mirror you could visually align the location hole for the tool in the block. The timing hole in the crankshaft is very obvious. You could even sand down a wooden dowel and insert it into the timing hole and just check that it doesn't move relative to the hole in the block.

Best regards,

Phil C.
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