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Thermostat Housing -ramblings

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321dave   
Wed Nov 01 2017, 08:24am
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
Jas16 wrote ...

this is making me worried. As far as I know in the cars 10 year, 111k history no cooling related items have been changed apart from water pump as part of cambelt service at 100K earlier this year.

I will go through the car's history paperwork again to be sure.


No need to be worried, best to have it inspected now just for your peace of mind. Hopefully you have a good garage who would know to take a quick look. All the garage needs is any inspection camera and a few minutes. Try and check it out soon. They are lovely cars to drive!
vaho   
Wed Nov 01 2017, 08:53am
Joined: Jun 25 2015
Member No: #2228
Location: Tallinn
On 2.7 HDI you can always install a coolant level sensor. Then you basically do not have to worry and prematurely change these pieces. You can inspect and take action after the level drops and there is a warning.
1 User said Thank You to vaho for this Post :
 cruiserphil (06 Nov : 10:13)
e3steve   
Wed Nov 01 2017, 09:05am
Joined: Jan 21 2013
Member No: #1163
Location: Warsash, Hants & Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Tjensen wrote ...

Is it age or distance (=heat ?) that kills the plastic? Both are available quite cheap on ebay. I have now (130 000km, 7 years) changed one (in the alterantor area) and have both as new spares.

I’m not certain if the 3.0HDi has the same part or not; I should take a close look at mine, really!
e3steve   
Wed Nov 01 2017, 09:18am
Joined: Jan 21 2013
Member No: #1163
Location: Warsash, Hants & Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Jas16 wrote ...

this is making me worried. As far as I know in the cars 10 year, 111k history no cooling related items have been changed apart from water pump as part of cambelt service at 100K earlier this year.

I will go through the car's history paperwork again to be sure.
If you have any doubt, change it out! It’s not an expensive part, nor is the job itself difficult if one knows the engine well. I can swap them out — the ‘stat housings — in around two hours and without breaking any of the peripherals that are in the way.

The alternative is heartache and, as some have found, can be fatal for the engine!

The coolant inlet (on the front of the engine and above the alternator) tends to just weep; you’ll smell the coolant when the engine is hot. The coolant outlet (‘stat housing — in between the vee) distorts and bursts open at the seam from heat and cooling system pressure. That pressure is greatly reduced to practically zero if the correct OAT coolant is used. It’s the presence of any added water — even deionised — that creates elevated pressure.

Incidentally, while working in the engine’s vee it would be wise and economical to test and replace the glowplugs, as the task of doing so is much easier once that outlet/housing has been removed...
321dave   
Wed Nov 01 2017, 09:34am
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
e3steve wrote ...

Jas16 wrote ...

this is making me worried. As far as I know in the cars 10 year, 111k history no cooling related items have been changed apart from water pump as part of cambelt service at 100K earlier this year.

I will go through the car's history paperwork again to be sure.
If you have any doubt, change it out! It’s not an expensive part, nor is the job itself difficult if one knows the engine well. I can swap them out — the ‘stat housings — in around two hours and without breaking any of the peripherals that are in the way.

The alternative is heartache and, as some have found, can be fatal for the engine!

The coolant inlet (on the front of the engine and above the alternator) tends to just weep; you’ll smell the coolant when the engine is hot. The coolant outlet (‘stat housing — in between the vee) distorts and bursts open at the seam from heat and cooling system pressure. That pressure is greatly reduced to practically zero if the correct OAT coolant is used. It’s the presence of any added water — even deionised — that creates elevated pressure.

Incidentally, while working in the engine’s vee it would be wise and economical to test and replace the glowplugs, as the task of doing so is much easier once that outlet/housing has been removed...



Incidentally, I was about to set to work on some other part of the car and got out to open the garage door I borrow from time to time and was about to drive it in and as luck would have it my inlet (weeping tank) let go right there and then, and dumped it on the laneway!! I just drove into the garage and fitted a new one straight away!! I'm still in shock how lucky I was. I think the car held on till I was ready, what a good C6 I have
2 User said Thank You to 321dave for this Post :
 FraserG (01 Nov : 19:55) , e3steve (02 Nov : 07:52)
Jas16   
Thu Nov 02 2017, 12:27am
Joined: Feb 07 2017
Member No: #2994
Location: Hereford
thanks all, I wasn't clear in my original post, but is it different as mine is the 2.2hdi version?
e3steve   
Thu Nov 02 2017, 07:53am
Joined: Jan 21 2013
Member No: #1163
Location: Warsash, Hants & Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Jas16 wrote ...

thanks all, I wasn't clear in my original post, but is it different as mine is the 2.2hdi version?

Yep.
Dave-Retired   
Thu Nov 02 2017, 09:57am

Joined: Oct 01 2009
Member No: #1
Location: Northumberland
vaho wrote ...

On 2.7 HDI you can always install a coolant level sensor. Then you basically do not have to worry and prematurely change these pieces. You can inspect and take action after the level drops and there is a warning.

You can also press the 'trip' button on the head unit and have the temperature display on the screen.

For me 'preventative' maintenance is far better than waiting for something to go wrong as the coolant level will not drop slowly but very quickly if the housing splits under pressure.

From gmerry original information request 7-8 years from build seems to be the maximum time frame where attention should be paid to the thermostat housing (Water Outlet Tank 1336-Y3 ) on a 2.7 HDi. Possibly due to loss of the 'plasticizers' over time which happens in varying degrees with most, if not all, plastic based material.
Website
1 User said Thank You to Dave-Retired for this Post :
 Tjensen (02 Nov : 11:02)
RodHagen   
Thu Dec 14 2017, 03:27am
Joined: Feb 04 2017
Member No: #2989
Location: Victoria
We lost the thermostat housings on two 2.7L HDis (Peug 407s) within 5000kms of 110,000 kms. In both cases the failure was at the "seam". In each case it was clear that the failure was partly due to one of the threaded receptors for the machine screws holding the thermostat in place "letting go" from the plastic in the rear part of the housing. This seems to have reduced the strength of the overall device enough to cause the seam to split, presumably when the thermostat opened or some such. In one case the rear smaller (oil cooler?) hose connector had also partially failed.

I managed to get a few more thousand kms out of one of the housings by sealing with heat resisting epoxy, and adding self tapping screw where possible around the periphery, but it is really much less time consuming to simply replace it. Amazing how quickly you can replace it with a bit of practice following the instructions on this site!

Don't know about on the C6 version of the engine, but its worth noting both the alternator clutch pulley and the accessories serpentine belt went on each car at almost the same time as the thermostat housing failures!

Chatted to a very experienced Peugeot mechanic who said he'd met with very few 2.7 V6 HDi engines on Peugeots or Citroens that hadn't suffered similar failures to the same three components by 120,000kms.
1 User said Thank You to RodHagen for this Post :
 cruiserphil (17 Dec : 20:36)
321dave   
Thu Dec 14 2017, 02:48pm
Joined: Sep 09 2011
Member No: #614
Location: Dublin
RodHagen wrote ...

We lost the thermostat housings on two 2.7L HDis (Peug 407s) within 5000kms of 110,000 kms. In both cases the failure was at the "seam". In each case it was clear that the failure was partly due to one of the threaded receptors for the machine screws holding the thermostat in place "letting go" from the plastic in the rear part of the housing. This seems to have reduced the strength of the overall device enough to cause the seam to split, presumably when the thermostat opened or some such. In one case the rear smaller (oil cooler?) hose connector had also partially failed.

I managed to get a few more thousand kms out of one of the housings by sealing with heat resisting epoxy, and adding self tapping screw where possible around the periphery, but it is really much less time consuming to simply replace it. Amazing how quickly you can replace it with a bit of practice following the instructions on this site!

Don't know about on the C6 version of the engine, but its worth noting both the alternator clutch pulley and the accessories serpentine belt went on each car at almost the same time as the thermostat housing failures!

Chatted to a very experienced Peugeot mechanic who said he'd met with very few 2.7 V6 HDi engines on Peugeots or Citroens that hadn't suffered similar failures to the same three components by 120,000kms.


Hope all was ok, it's the real and only issue I think everyone with the 2.7hdi need to check and be quite vigilant about. I think nearly everyone on the forum has had a brief moment. I was lucky, and I still warn people. In fact all we need is a re-engineered pipe in metal to replace those plastic parts really. One of these days I'll rapid proto-type a (metal one) from the new systems coming on stream! Must start to look into that. Jay Leno is doing similiar, it allows him to run his old vehicles and even improve on old part designs.
3 User said Thank You to 321dave for this Post :
 FraserG (14 Dec : 20:55) , cruiserphil (17 Dec : 20:36) , e3steve (18 Dec : 22:09)
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